Latest Event Updates

Moses Robinson: Gang Awareness Training for Educators

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NextGen School Safety speaker Moses Robinson says even in schools without organized gangs, educators must be aware of gang-like behavior.

Watch Officer Robinson summarize his approach to gang awareness training for educators.

Officer Robinson has worked for more than a decade training schools and educators to avoid contributing to the cycle of violence for trauma-exposed students.  He has also partnered with the U.S. Department of Education to provide training on supportive school discipline initiatives.  Officer Robinson will present a session entitled At the Intersection of School Safety and Supportive Discipline: Navigating the Roles and Responsibilities of School Resource Officers at the NextGen School Safety Conference in Atlanta.

At the NextGen School Safety Conference, school safety coordinators, school resource officers, principals, heads of school, superintendents, board members, student services directors, risk management directors, loss control coordinators, health services coordinators, school nurses and human resources personnel will come together to focus on all aspects of improving the physical safety of students and educators.  REGISTER NOW!

PRE-CONFERENCE OPPORTUNITIES – 6/21/17 – Register for a conference bundle!

Morning Sessions: 9:00 am – 12:00 pm

  • Brian Mendler, M.Ed. – Motivating & Managing Hard-to-Reach, Uninterested & Disruptive Students
  • Rick Fernandez, Ed.D. – Hiring and Staffing for Success with Turnaround Schools
  • Rick Shaw – Active Shooter: Lessons Learned from Sandy Hook & Other Violent Incidents
  • Craig McCullough – Autism & Trauma Connections and Interactions – What Educators Need to Understand

Afternoon Sessions: 1:00 pm – 4:00 pm

  • Larry Thompson, M.Ed. – Closing the Exits off the Road to Responsibility: Supportive, Non-Exclusionary Discipline
  • Mike Paget, M.Ed. – Positive Behavioral Supports with Students Who Are Wired Differently
  • Brad Chapin, MS, LCP, LMLP – Self- Regulation Training: Framework for Success
  • Mike Shaw – Youth Risk-Taking Behavior: Shifting the Mindset

Click here to view a preliminary listing of Atlanta sessions.

Reminder: After “13 Reasons Why”: Creating a Context for Suicide Prevention – Webinar May 25

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13Reasons

13 Reasons Why is a trending Netflix series that is wildly popular among students. After the lead character, Hannah, commits suicide, a classmate receives a series of tapes that identify the people and reasons for her decision. Due to the glamorization of teen suicide and the negative portrayal of Hannah’s experience with counseling, there is great concern among professionals about the negative impact on students – and the potential for a contagion effect. 

What Can Educators Do?

This 90-minute webinar will discuss how teachers and counselors can use 13 Reasons Why as an opportunity to examine how students perceive suicide and to expand the conversation about suicide prevention. This series naturally opens doors to topics such as suicide, self-injury, sexual assault, bullying and the choices students make.

Presenter Kaye Randall, MSW, LISW-CP presents seminars on suicide and self-injury throughout North America and has written books on self-injury, bullying and depression. She will discuss how 13 Reasons Why presents an opportunity to check in on student perceptions of the series and to reset misperceptions surrounding what they have watched – including the process of seeking help.

The dialogue around the Netflix series, as well as the book by Jay Asher, can also provide an opportunity to look at and improve the existing framework for preventing and/or dealing with suicide and self-injury among students.

Watch Kaye Randall explain how concerned educators can help prevent youth suicide.

WEBINAR HIGHLIGHTS WILL INCLUDE:

  • Creating a framework to process 13 Reasons Why with faculty, staff and students
  • Resetting the context to response not reaction
  • Using interpretation to power prevention
  • Helping students create connections
  • Focusing on intervention and steering students to help and healing

LEARNING OBJECTIVES:

In this webinar, you will learn to:

  • Learn how to use 13 Reasons Why to stimulate healthy discussions on suicide, depression, self-injury, sexual assault and bullying.
  • Identify strategies that can help guide students toward a context of hope and healing. 
  • Discover steps that teachers, counselors and other educators can take to prevent suicide and reduce “suicide contagion.”
  • Learn how to use the dialogue surrounding this best-selling book and Netflix series to take inventory of current suicide prevention and response protocols.
  • Discern ways to reset an unhealthy context to one of responsibility and growth.

WHO SHOULD ATTEND:

  • School Psychologists
  • Principals & Assistant Principals
  • Other School Administrators
  • School Counselors
  • Counselors in Agencies and Private Practice
  • Teachers
  • School Nurses
  • Special Education Personnel
  • Social Workers (All levels)
  • After-School Program Coordinators
  • At-Risk Coordinators
  • School Resource Officers

REGISTER NOW:

Thursday, May 25th @

11:30 am & 2:00 pm ET

Click here to register with a purchase order.  We also accept purchase orders by fax or mail.

For questions about this webinar or how to register, email pd@accutrain.com or call 800-251-6805.

ABOUT THE PRESENTER:

Kaye Randall is a nationally known author and speaker who has led professional seminars throughout North America on student mental health, bullying, self-injury, depression, anxiety and anger — as well as youth leadership and student empowerment. The former Training Director for the University of South Carolina Center for Child & Family Studies, Kaye has inspired seminar participants through her practical insights, humor and proactive strategies for helping children and adolescents. She continues to provide clinical services to both children and adolescents and has been named social worker of the year by the Council on Adoptable Children. She is co-author of See My Pain, Creative Strategies & Activities for Helping Young People Who Self-Injure (featured in USA Today), 102 Creative Strategies for Working with Depressed Children & Adolescents, and Mean Girls: 101½ Creative Strategies and Activities for Working with Relational Aggression.

David Rendall: “Weirdness” Can = Excellence

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David Rendall says educators can help students discover more of who they are – by encouraging them to “become more different and more unique, not more average and more mediocre.”

Watch David Rendall explain duality of “weirdness.”

Rendall will deliver a keynote session entitled The Freak Factor: Discovering Uniqueness by Flaunting Weakness at the Wired Differently Conference in Atlanta.  His plenary session is entitled Funny for a Change: Using Humor to Create Serious Transformation.

Now in its 5th year, the Wired Differently Conference is an information-packed event that showcases a wide array of best practices for reaching and teaching students with emotional and behavioral challenges — especially in inclusive settings.  REGISTER NOW!

CLICK TO VIEW PRELIMINARY LISTING OF ATLANTA SESSIONS.

PRE-CONFERENCE OPPORTUNITIES – 6/21/17 – Register for a conference bundle!

Morning Sessions: 9:00 am – 12:00 pm

  • Brian Mendler, M.Ed. – Motivating & Managing Hard-to-Reach, Uninterested & Disruptive Students
  • Rick Fernandez, Ed.D. – Hiring and Staffing for Success with Turnaround Schools
  • Rick Shaw – Active Shooter: Lessons Learned from Sandy Hook & Other Violent Incidents
  • Craig McCullough – Autism & Trauma Connections and Interactions – What Educators Need to Understand

Afternoon Sessions: 1:00 pm – 4:00 pm

  • Larry Thompson, M.Ed. – Closing the Exits off the Road to Responsibility: Supportive, Non-Exclusionary Discipline
  • Mike Paget, M.Ed. – Positive Behavioral Supports with Students Who Are Wired Differently
  • Brad Chapin, MS, LCP, LMLP – Self- Regulation Training: Framework for Success
  • Mike Shaw – Youth Risk-Taking Behavior: Shifting the Mindset

In the Aftermath of “13 Reasons Why”: Creating a Context for Suicide Prevention – Webinar 5/25

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May 25th @ 11:30 am or 2:00 pm

13Reasons

13 Reasons Why is a trending Netflix series that is wildly popular among students. After the lead character, Hannah, commits suicide, a classmate receives a series of tapes that identify the people and reasons for her decision. Due to the glamorization of teen suicide and the negative portrayal of Hannah’s experience with counseling, there is great concern among professionals about the negative impact on students – and the potential for a contagion effect.

What Can Educators Do?
This 90-minute webinar will discuss how teachers and counselors can use 13 Reasons Why as an opportunity to examine how students perceive suicide and to expand the conversation about suicide prevention. This series naturally opens doors to topics such as suicide, self-injury, sexual assault, bullying and the choices students make.

Presenter Kaye Randall, MSW, LISW-CP presents seminars on suicide and self-injury throughout North America and has written books on self-injury, bullying and depression. She will discuss how 13 Reasons Why presents an opportunity to check in on student perceptions of the series and to reset misperceptions surrounding what they have watched – including the process of seeking help.
The dialogue around the Netflix series, as well as the book by Jay Asher, can also provide an opportunity to look at and improve the existing framework for preventing and/or dealing with suicide and self-injury among students.

WEBINAR HIGHLIGHTS WILL INCLUDE:

  • Creating a framework to process 13 Reasons Why with faculty, staff and students
  • Resetting the context to response not reaction
  • Using interpretation to power prevention
  • Helping students create connections
  • Focusing on intervention and steering students to help and healing

LEARNING OBJECTIVES:
In this webinar, you will learn to:

  • Learn how to use 13 Reasons Why to stimulate healthy discussions on suicide, depression, self-injury, sexual assault and bullying.
  • Identify strategies that can help guide students toward a context of hope and healing.
  • Discover steps that teachers, counselors and other educators can take to prevent suicide and reduce “suicide contagion.”
  • Learn how to use the dialogue surrounding this best-selling book and Netflix series to take inventory of current suicide prevention and response protocols.
  • Discern ways to reset an unhealthy context to one of responsibility and growth.

REGISTER NOW

Thursday, May 25th @
11:30 am & 2:00 pm

Click here to register with a purchase order.  We also accept purchase orders by fax or mail.

WHO SHOULD ATTEND:

  • Principals & Assistant Principals
  • Other School Administrators
  • School Counselors
  • Counselors in Agencies and Private Practice
  • Teachers
  • Special Education Personnel
  • Social Workers (All levels)
  • After-School Program Coordinators
  • At-Risk Coordinators
  • School Resource Officers

ABOUT THE PRESENTER:

RANDALL150

Kaye Randall is a nationally known author and speaker who has led professional seminars throughout North America on student mental health, bullying, self-injury, depression, anxiety and anger — as well as youth leadership and student empowerment. The former Training Director for the University of South Carolina Center for Child & Family Studies, Kaye has inspired seminar participants through her practical insights, humor and proactive strategies for helping children and adolescents. She continues to provide clinical services to both children and adolescents and has been named social worker of the year by the Council on Adoptable Children. She is co-author of See My Pain, Creative Strategies & Activities for Helping Young People Who Self-Injure (featured in USA Today), 102 Creative Strategies for Working with Depressed Children & Adolescents, and Mean Girls: 101½ Creative Strategies and Activities for Working with Relational Aggression.

A Message from Steph Jensen: Mean Girls Behind the Smart Phone Screen

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A message from Pre-Conference Presenter Steph Jensen regarding girls and their not-so-smart phone usage:

Watch Steph Jensen preview her pre-conference session in Las Vegas.

Award-winning author and international speaker, Steph Jensen will present a 3-hour pre-conference session entitled Mean Girls: Behind the Screen – Addressing & Preventing Bullying, Cyberbullying & Relational Aggression in Las Vegas.  

Now in its 11th year, the Girl Bullying & Empowerment Conference has raised awareness of the unique nature of female relationships and provided solutions for relational aggression – including online aggression and cyberbullying — among girls. This conference helps educators understand the latest research, while learning about field-tested strategies designed to cultivate leadership skills and empower young women.  

REGISTER NOW

Click here to view a preliminary listing for Las Vegas sessions.

A Message from Steph Jensen – “Positive Alternatives to Zero-Tolerance” Session in Vegas!

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A message from Steph Jensen:

Watch Steph Jensen outline her session, Integrating Positive Alternatives to Zero-Tolerance.

Award-winning author and international speaker, Steph Jensen will present a keynote session at the School Climate & Culture Conference.  

Scholars struggle to consistently define and distinguish the terms, but educators agree on the need to transform both “climate” and “culture” to improve academic outcomes. This event features practical, real-world initiatives that are successfully transforming the quality, character and personality of schools.  It showcases programs, assessments and tools proven to improve school culture and climate.  Evidence-based and research-based interventions will be introduced, while the forum also highlights high-potential efforts currently being implemented in the laboratory of everyday school life.  REGISTER NOW!

SAMPLE SESSIONS

  • Student-Led Discipline: Teaching Your Students to Manage Themselves
  • Effective Climate Surveys: You Can’t Know What You Don’t Ask!
  • How to Motivate the Unmotivated: Teaching with Poverty in Mind
  • How to Reach the (Sometimes) Hard-to-Reach

Click to see a preliminary listing of Summit sessions.

PRE-CONFERENCES – TUESDAY, JUNE 27TH – ADD A CONFERENCE BUNDLE!

MORNING PRE-CONFERENCES: 9:00 am – 12:00 pm

  • Larry Thompson, M.Ed. – Closing the Exits off the Road to Responsibility: Supportive, Non-Exclusionary Discipline
  • Rick Shaw – Effective Climate Surveys: You Can’t Know What You Don’t Ask
  • Mike Paget, M.Ed. – The PBIS/MTSS Maze: Avoiding Dangerous Pitfalls & Finding the Path to Success
  • Kaye Randall, MSW, LISW-CP – Teaching Self-Regulation: Helping Students Excel in School & Life

​AFTERNOON PRE-CONFERENCES: 1:00 pm – 4:00 pm

  • Brian Mendler, M.Ed. – Motivating & Managing Hard-to-Reach, Uninterested & Disruptive Students
  • Richard Guerry – Cultivating Positive School Climate with Guidelines & Tools for Digital Abuse Prevention
  • Eric Clark, M.Ed. – 25 Tech Tools Teachers Can Use to Enhance Student Engagement
  • Stephanie Jensen, MS, LPC – Mean Girls: Addressing & Preventing Bullying, Cyberbullying & Relational

Using “13 Reasons Why” as a Tool to Expand the Conversation About Suicide Prevention: Kaye Randall

Posted on

RANDALL150Kaye Randall is a nationally-known author and speaker who has led professional seminars throughout North America on student mental health, bullying, self-injury, depression, anxiety and anger – as well as youth leadership and student empowerment.  The former Training Director for the University of South Carolina Center for Child & Family Studies, Kaye has inspired seminar participants through her practical insights, humor and proactive strategies for helping children and adolescents. She continues to provide clinical services to both children and adolescents and has been named social worker of the year by the Council on Adoptable Children. She is co-author of See My Pain, Creative Strategies & Activities for Helping Young People Who Self-Injure (featured in USA Today), 102 Creative Strategies for Working with Depressed Children & Adolescents, and Mean Girls: 101½ Creative Strategies and Activities for Working with Relational Aggression.


13reasonswhy15013 Reasons Why – Teacher Discussion Guide

13 Reasons Why is a trending Netflix series based on the book series by Jay Asher that many of our youth are watching. After a teenage girl commits suicide, a classmate receives a series of tapes that identify the people and reasons for her suicide. However well-intentioned the producers may have been when creating this series from the book, there is great concern among many professionals about the potential negative impact on our youth. Through the glamorization of teen suicide and the negative portrayal of the helping experience, the concern is that there will be an increase in self-harming and or suicidal behaviors and a decrease in help-seeking behaviors.

We can use this trending topic as an opportunity to expand the conversation about suicide prevention and examine how OUR students perceive the topic of suicide and help us look at and improve our existing framework.

What Can Teachers Do?

For many this series is bringing up topics of conversation such as suicide, self-harm, bullying, sexual assault, and the choices we may make.  Responding to this in a productive and healing way is vitally important. Teachers are in a unique position to have classroom conversations about this series. This is an opportunity to check in with student perceptions and evaluations of the series and to possibly reset any misperceptions surrounding what they have watched including the process of seeking help. Classroom discussions may also create a shared connection in finding solutions in improving the prevention process and in helping each other through the challenges of life.

Suggestions for Teachers  – Responding to 13 Reasons Why

There are many ways to approach the discussion of suicide and how it is portrayed in the series. The following suggestions set up an initial broader context within which to have this conversation with your students.

  1. Due to the sensitivity of the topic, it is important to check in with your school counselor and or administrators to see if there is a coordinated response planned to the faculty, staff, parents and students.
  2. It is important that you share with the school counselor your desire to either have or be prepared to have conversations in your classroom surrounding the series. They may have suggestions that may support you. In addition, making the school counselor aware will help in preparation should a student become concerned or triggered by the conversation.
  3. Think about how you want to guide the conversation. Initially keep the conversation to a broader context of examining the topic of suicide and how it is portrayed in the series. What did they think of the series? What did they come away with?
  4. What did they think was working in the context of suicide prevention and what wasn’t working to support prevention? You could compare and contrast with how they think things are handled in their school. What is working and not working in their own school setting? Family setting?
  5. Discuss the portrayal of the second school counselor…this is an opportunity to reset the narrative and to encourage help-seeking behavior.
  6. What could we/they do to support change?
  7. Close with a reminder about taking care of ourselves, the necessity to reach out for help and to notice, reach out and help others.
  8. Encourage students to talk to you or the school counselor if any feelings surface that are concerning or triggering based on the conversations.

We can choose to respond to 13 Reasons Why in a way that expands the conversation about suicide prevention and is also productive and healing in nature.  As suicide is now the second leading cause of death among our youth, we as professionals also need to expand how we approach this preventable problem hurting our youth. We are all involved in the solution.

There is Always HOPE!